Welcome to Mehring Books!

My Cart:

0 item(s) - $0.00
You have no items in your shopping cart.

0

Kronstadt and Petrograd in 1917

Double click on above image to view full picture

Zoom Out
Zoom In

Kronstadt and Petrograd in 1917

By F. F. Raskolnikov
 

Availability: In stock

$18.95

Quick Overview

Raskolnikov's account of the role played by the Kronstadt sailors is an essential document of the October Revolution. Trotsky, in his own history of the revolution, made repeated references to it. A leader of the sailors, the author was 25 in 1917 and a heroic figure in his own right. This lively account was first published in 1925.
OR

Additional Information

Description

Raskolnikov's account of the role played by the Kronstadt sailors is an essential document of the October Revolution. Trotsky, in his own history of the revolution, made repeated references to it. A leader of the sailors, the author was 25 in 1917 and a heroic figure in his own right. This lively account was first published in 1925.

See also

Author F. F. Raskolnikov
About the Author

F.F. Raskolnikov (1892-1939) was a leader of the Kronstadt sailors during the Russian Revolution and a hero of the Civil War. He joined the Bolshevik Party in 1910 while a student and became a writer for Pravda. He was arrested in 1912 by the Tsarist regime, but released in an amnesty proclaimed in 1913. With the outbreak of World War I he was called into the armed forces and joined the navy.

His experiences during the February and October 1917 revolutions are related in Kronstadt and Petrograd in 1917. After the October Revolution he served as Deputy Commissar for Naval Affairs and played an important role in the Civil War against the White armies on several fronts. He was captured by the British in December 1918, but later released in a prisoner exchange. After his release he commanded naval forces in the Caspian region.

He later served in various diplomatic posts and was involved in the Eastern Department of the Communist International. Although he had never been a member of the Left Opposition, when summoned to Moscow in 1938 at the height of the purges he sought refuge in France, fearing arrest. In 1939 the Supreme Court of the USSR declared Raskolnikov an outlaw. In response, he wrote an Open Letter to Stalin, denouncing his bureaucratic regime. He died one month later in a Paris nursing home under murky circumstances. Friends alleged he was poisoned.

Publisher New Park
Pages 368
Publication Type Paperback
ISBN 978-0-929087-95-5
ISSN No

Product Tags

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.